Monthly Archives: May 2007

What does the boss think?

Attitudes of presidents and provosts on the university library is the title of an interesting article in the current issue of College & Research Libraries [68(3), May 2007]. The authors found that, although leaders recognize the symbolic value of the university library, it is the functional role of the library in service to the university’s … Continue reading What does the boss think?

Resolving the serials supply chain

Link resolvers and the serials supply chain [pdf] is the title of an interesting report commissioned by the UK Serials Group and written by James Culling. From the summary: The current knowledge base data supply chain is characterized by a complex series of roles, relationships and inter-dependencies between publishers, other content hosts, subscription agents, link … Continue reading Resolving the serials supply chain

QOTD: a medium of few words

It has been interesting seeing how quickly the ‘long tail’ has been adopted as a phrase in a wide range of discussion and analysis. There is an article in the current First Monday by Kalevi Kilkki which applies a long tail model to data in several different areas. This paragraph sort of just jumped out … Continue reading QOTD: a medium of few words

QOTD: the convenience of online

From the blog of Harvard economist, Dani Rodrik: An article in Sunday’s NYT magazine prompted me to look at Bryan Caplan‘s book The Myth of the Rational Voter. I haven’t read the whole book, just the bits that are online. It is a thought-provoking piece, and a god read. But I am not convinced. [Sage … Continue reading QOTD: the convenience of online

LCWGFBC II

The report from the second open meeting of the Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control is now available. The topic was Structures and Standards for Bibliographic Data.

Social media

I have just watched the video [video opens on a web page] of a fascinating talk by Joshua Prince-Ramus, the principal architect of the Seattle Public Library. He talks about two core positions. The first is that books are a technology, something, he suggests that people tend to forget. They have been a dominant technology … Continue reading Social media

In the flow – Washington and Wikipedia

In recent presentations I have been referring to the University of Washington’s initiative to systematically put links to its digital collections in relevant Wikipedia entries. I use it as an example of putting library resources ‘in the flow’ of their users’s behavior. If Wikipedia is where many folks end up when they are looking for … Continue reading In the flow – Washington and Wikipedia

Four sources of metadata about things

I think it is useful to think of four sources of descriptive metadata in libraries. These are not mutually exclusive, and one of the interesting questions we have to address is how they will be mobilized effectively together. I don’t have good names for these. How about: professional, contributed, programmatically promoted, and intentional? Professional The … Continue reading Four sources of metadata about things

Universal search and the rich texture of suggestion

There has been some discussion – less than I expected – about Google’s steps to develop a unified search across its services (blogsearch, booksearch, YouTube, etc) so that blogs, video, books, maps, and so on are returned in results on the main Google site. This latest refinement sounds simple, but it isn’t. According to the … Continue reading Universal search and the rich texture of suggestion

American Idol and intentional data

Blake is the favorite to win American Idol in our house but we thought he was going to lose out last night based on last week’s performances. Not so. I was interested to read the comment on the Yahoo! TV blog about why Melinda did not go through: Over the last week, Blake Lewis pulled … Continue reading American Idol and intentional data