Some commentary on how the experience of the web will move from one where destinations dominate to one where lightweight client-side approaches shape presentation and consumption. This is a world where links matter more: services built on URLs, maybe Coins, ....

From Darwinian Web:

The explosion I am talking about is the shifting of a website's content from internal to external. Instead of a website being a "place" where data "is" and other sites "point" to, a website will be a source of data that is in many external databases, including Google. Why "go" to a website when all of its content has already been absorbed and remixed into the collective datastream. [Darwinian Web: Friday, November 18, 2005]
And Dion Hinchcliffe quoting from Dan Saffer of Adaptive Path:
The tools we'll use to find, read, filter, use, mix, remix, and connect us to the Internet will have to be smarter and do a lot more work than the ones we have now. Part of that work is in formatting. Who and what determines how something looks and works? On the unstructured side of the continuum, perhaps only a veneer of form will remain. "Looks" will be an uneasy mix of the data and the tools we use to view it. Visual design is moving away from its decentralized locations on websites. Indeed, design is becoming centralized in the tools and methods we use to view and interact with content. Firefox users can already use extensions like Adblock, and especially Greasemonkey, to change the look of the Web pages they visit. RSS readers let users customize how they want to view feeds from a variety of sources. Soon, expect to see this type of customization happening with bits of functionality as well as content. [Tolerance and Experience Continuums (web2.wsj2.com)]
Initial links via Read/write web which also has an interesting picture about the use of RSS.

Comments: 0

Nov 23, 2005
p

excellent article. yes i agree on some points..."Looks" will be an uneasy mix of the data and the tools we use to view it. Visual design is moving away from its decentralized locations on websites.