Mashups

Raymond Yee is the originator of the useful triple "gather, create, share", and is known for his work on the Scholar's Box. He lectures at the UC Berkeley School of Information.

I have just got a copy of his book:

Yee, Raymond. Pro Web 2.0 Mashups: Remixing Data and Web Services. Berkeley, CA: Apress, 2008.

There is an accompanying blog, Mashup Guide which also has some material from the book, including a table of contents. The table of contents shows the wide range of approaches and services he looks at.

Here is a scope note from the introduction:

The overall flow of the book is: What can be done with no programming -> programming of one system (through its API) -> figuring out how to combine 2 or several systems -> creating "service composition frameworks" for combining arbitrary systems.

It would be easy to veer off into heavy-duty theory in this book. Instead, we will keep grounded in "practical interoperability" (a grab-what-we-can-from-wherever approach) while dipping into the deeper pools of grand unification efforts (such as the full semantic web vision) that have so far not come to full fruition.

It is nice to see LibraryLookup used as an introductory example in a mainstream text like this. And to see some discussion of LCSH, FAST and Dewey in the chapter on tagging.

Yee claims that the book is useful for the experienced developer as well as for more novice users (with some knowledge of HTML, CSS and JavaScript).

I have passed the book over to my colleague, Ralph Levan, for a more technical review. I will point to his review when it is done.

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