Card Catalogue Online

I was interested to come across the University of Bristol's 'Card catalogue online', a resource based on scanned images of catalogue cards.

The digitisation project involved scanning 300,000 cards covering pre-1978 material held in the Arts and Social Sciences Library and all other branch libraries (except the Medical Library).
As well as providing a browse facility that gives users access to images of the original cards onscreen, Card Catalogue Online is able to perform full-text searches of the item descriptions recorded on the cards.
[Bristol University | Information Services | Card Catalogue Online launched]

bristolcard.png

Edmund Burke was a sometime MP for Bristol.

Comments: 5

Jan 13, 2009
Dick Chamberlain

Bristol' s digitised card catalogue follows in the footsteps of the University of Nottingham's - see http://nottingham.dilib.info/ - which has been live since October 2006. Both systems use the Chopin 2006 software from Schneider GmbH. Schneider digitised 280,000 cards at Nottingham in two weeks.

Jan 13, 2009
Bryan

Princeton University (NJ) did something like this a few years ago:

Princeton University Supplementary Catalog (Formerly known as the Electronic Card Catalog)
http://imagecat1.princeton.edu/ECC/

Jan 15, 2009
Tim Spalding

Did you ever see this one?

http://www.librarything.com/thingology/2007/07/library-01.php

In my opinion, these things aren't that much worse than the current systems. They're cheaper, anyway, and that's something.

Tim

Jan 20, 2009
Lorcan Dempsey

@Tim - I looked, but the link out to the card from the entry was broken.

@Dick - it would be interesting to know when you are finished the conversion and you can close down unlecc!

Jan 28, 2009
Dick Chamberlain

As to when Nottingham can close UNLECC - well, no funding in sight for a big retrocon project to get this material into our Aleph OPAC. But in 2 years we have blanked out 40,000 cards in UNLECC, either because the book's been discarded or because we have managed to pull some retro work into the schedule of the Cat/Metadata Team. So you'd think maybe within 10 years the whole thing would go - only we keep finding new metadata things for the Team (mainly repository stuff)and retrocon always struggles to get off the bottom of the priority list.