Featured Articles

Stitching costs

We are familiar with switching costs, the costs of changing a supplier. I may decide not to change my phone or email arrangements, for example, because I do not want to incur the effort of notifying all my contacts. Libraries are very familiar with switching costs given the range of data migration issues involved in … Continue reading Stitching costs

Stuck in the middle ….

Much of our current model of network information and communication behavior is in the middle ground, it is based on the personal computer (desk- or lap-top) as a consumption target and the organizational website as the delivery target. In other words, the library website is the front door to network library services consumed on the … Continue reading Stuck in the middle ….

Name authorities

Libraries have invested significantly in name authority work over the years, and have created extensive infrastructure to help manage names of people and organizations. The relationship between this work and broader interest in this topic is something that will need to be addressed in coming years if this work is to continue to have utility. … Continue reading Name authorities

Some thoughts about egos, objects, and social networks …

More of a linked list of other people’s thoughts … about egos and objects. I quote some pieces below: all of the posts are suggestive and worth reading. The linking theme is that people connect and share themselves through ‘social objects’, pictures, books, or other shared interests, and that successful social networks are those which … Continue reading Some thoughts about egos, objects, and social networks …

The two ways of Web 2.0

I find Web 2.0 increasingly confusing as a label; no surprise there. This is not just because of its essential vagueness, but because I think it tends to be used in a couple of very different ways. Where this happens there is bound to be some confusion. Schematically, I will use the labels ‘diffusion’ and … Continue reading The two ways of Web 2.0

Library process automation: the ecology of providers

Just as I began to see messages about the publication of Marshall Breeding’s report on his survey of library perceptions of their system vendor I was reading The new economics of the BI market by Jerry Held on The Database Column blog. He talks about consolidation within the BI (Business Intelligence) market: “After more than … Continue reading Library process automation: the ecology of providers

The less common reader

The much-discussed, and somewhat contested, NEA report on reading came out at around the same time as The Uncommon Reader, a fictional account by Alan Bennett of the late discovery of reading by the Queen (of England). The conjunction was discussed in the New York Times: PERHAPS the most fantastical story of the year was … Continue reading The less common reader

Logistics and synchronization: making data work harder

Updated: 11/21/07 I have spoken about library logistics before. Logistics is about moving information, materials and services through a network cost-effectively. Resource sharing is supported by a library logistics apparatus. The emerging e-resource discovery to delivery chain, tied together with resolution services, is a logistics challenge. Many of the e-resource management issues are like supply-chain … Continue reading Logistics and synchronization: making data work harder

Quotes of the day (and other days?): persistent academic discourse

Here is Grainne Conole, professor of e-learning at the Open University writing about academic papers, conference papers, and blogging: Coming back to the question of which represents academic discourse – to my mind it’s all three – in different ways writing a paper, giving a presentation and blogging all help me to formulate and take … Continue reading Quotes of the day (and other days?): persistent academic discourse

The network reconfigures the library systems environment

One of the main issues facing libraries as they work to create richer user services is the complexity of their systems environment. Consider these pictures which I have been using in presentations for a while now. Reductively, we can think of three classes of systems – (1) the classic ILS focused on ‘bought’ materials, (2) … Continue reading The network reconfigures the library systems environment