Learning and research - systems and technologies

Research information management systems – a new service category?

It has been interesting watching Research Information Management or RIM emerge as a new service category in the last couple of years. RIM is supported by a particular system category, the Research Information Management System (RIMs), sometimes referred to by an earlier name, the CRIS (Current Research Information System). For reasons discussed below, this area … Continue reading Research information management systems – a new service category?

The amplified event …

I introduced the phrase The Amplfied Conference several years ago to describe the way in which a conference experience might be shared by people who were not physically present, through the amplification provided by a range of network tools. On reflection, of course, such amplification is also a way of enhancing the experience of people … Continue reading The amplified event …

3 stages of library websites …

While writing about subject pages and library websites the other day, it occurred to me that we might think of library websites in three stages – which emerged successively and continue to exist together. Always mindful of the rule of three 😉 We might clumsily call these stages: [1] fragmentary, [2] integrated supply, and [3] … Continue reading 3 stages of library websites …

Outside-in and inside-out redux

I have been using this phrase, outside-in and inside-out, to discuss a contrast in information management practices that is becoming more important. Here is how I spoke about it a little while ago in these pages: Think, for example, of a distinction between outside-in resources, where the library is buying or licensing materials from external … Continue reading Outside-in and inside-out redux

‘Reading at Library-scale’/’distant reading’

Franco Moretti has an interesting short book called Graphs, maps, trees: abstract models for literary history. He proposes a way of reading literary history which involves abstracting patterns across large stretches of a literary field rather than examining “concrete, individual works”. In particular, he works with three organizing models: graphs, maps and trees. He calls … Continue reading ‘Reading at Library-scale’/’distant reading’

Reading lists, citation management and bibliographic tissue

Here is something I wrote a couple of years ago under the title Personal reference collections as digital libraries. A little updating of examples and I think it still holds: We will see much more activity connecting user environments and bibliographic resources. I am thinking of citation managers, reading lists, social bookmarking sites (see citulike … Continue reading Reading lists, citation management and bibliographic tissue

QR codes again …

Andy Walsh of the University of Huddersfield gave a very nice presentation on QR Codes at the recent EMTACL10 conference at NTNU in Trondheim. I particularly liked his introduction in which he provided some motivating context for his work. He noted that as library spaces became places for social activity, their specifically informational dimension was … Continue reading QR codes again …

Lam-inating libraries ….

The shared interests between libraries, archives and museums (LAMs) is an important line of work for OCLC Research. However, a related issue is also of considerable interest for libraries. As we move into a digital environment, library work increasingly needs to understand and benefit from archival and museum perspectives. As libraries digitize primary materials, or … Continue reading Lam-inating libraries ….

Research assessment and the library …

I am pleased to note the appearance of a new report on research assessment and the role of libraries. This has been prepared as part of our Research Information Management stream of work in support of the RLG Partnership. The study is a comparative review of formal assessment regimes in five countries. Such assessment regimes … Continue reading Research assessment and the library …

Research support services

I am pleased to note a collaboration between OCLC Research and the Research Information Network in the UK to explore changing research support needs in universities. We tend to focus on how technology changes library practices, but the impact of technology on libraries will be less important in the long term than the impact of … Continue reading Research support services