Standards

Research information management systems – a new service category?

It has been interesting watching Research Information Management or RIM emerge as a new service category in the last couple of years. RIM is supported by a particular system category, the Research Information Management System (RIMs), sometimes referred to by an earlier name, the CRIS (Current Research Information System). For reasons discussed below, this area … Continue reading Research information management systems – a new service category?

An all-through system? From Onix to MARC

One of the recommendations of the LC Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control encouraged greater reliance on an ‘all-through’ system for bibliographic data, where data created upstream by publishers and others could be mobilized downstream by libraries. I was reminded of these words at the time. Records serve different requirements and needs and … Continue reading An all-through system? From Onix to MARC

Dublin core: the first fifteen years …

The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative celebrated fifteen years of existence on March 1st. The initiative began at a workshop in Dublin, Ohio, jointly organized by OCLC and NCSA. The second workshop inaugurated the series which has continued to this day morphing into the annual conference along the way. It was jointly organised by OCLC and … Continue reading Dublin core: the first fifteen years …

Name, rank and serial number

As authors are recognised as resources to be discovered, managed, ranked, and tracked, an interest in names and identifiers will continue to grow. A focus on research evaluation, reputation management, publication management drive this, as well as general information management issues in a web environment. Historically, national libraries have managed names within their jurisdictions. The … Continue reading Name, rank and serial number

VIAF design pattern

A blog entry by Paul Walk – An infrastructure service anti-pattern – drew some attention a while ago. He argues against a model in which a service provider independently develops APIs and a user interface, and in which, accordingly, the APIs are developed in advance of actual use or explicit external requirements. He claims that … Continue reading VIAF design pattern

Data flows in the book world

One of the recommendations of the Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control was that ways should be found of harnessing publisher data upstream of the cataloging process. The rationale was that this would make data about materials available earlier and reduce overall creation effort. OCLC recently organized an invitational symposium … Continue reading Data flows in the book world

Articles on structured data: matching, mining and mixing

The current issue of Library Resources and Technical Services (not on the web) has a couple of interesting articles which touch on the complications of processing inconsistent data. Creating organization name authority within an ERM system Kristen Blake and Jackquie Samples LRTS 53(2) April 2009 p 94-107 This article looks at issues of Organization name … Continue reading Articles on structured data: matching, mining and mixing

QOTD: IBM and standards

On the politics and business of standards making ….. Bob Sutor, vice president of open source and standards, tells me that Big Blue has decided to cast a cold eye over the performance of the standards bodies it belongs to – which number “several hundred” – and may drop its links to some. The process … Continue reading QOTD: IBM and standards

djatoka, OpenURL and OOMRef-J

djatoka, “A Reuse Friendly, Open Source JPEG 2000 Image Server” developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Research Library, was released recently. An article in D-Lib Magazine by Ryan Chute and Herbert Van de Sompel introduces it. A particular feature of the approach is its use of the OpenURL as enabling infrastructure: When it comes to … Continue reading djatoka, OpenURL and OOMRef-J

Flexibility may not be a good design goal

Jerry McDonough has written an interesting and important article about XML, interoperability, and the social context of standards making: Structural Metadata and the Social Limitation of Interoperability: A Sociotechnical View of XML and Digital Library Standards Development. Drawing on a number of examples he presents a strong conclusion: The digital library community seems to face … Continue reading Flexibility may not be a good design goal